6A1C7C8E-F459-4242-AAFF-0E181DCCCCA4_edited_edited_edited_edited_edited.jpg

Florida Supreme Court Certified Mediator in Orlando

48590FEB-A8AC-443B-AC4E-8317DE8FB0DA_edited.jpg

Alternative Dispute Resolution

Small Claims Court

County Court

Circuit Court

Foreclosure Court

Bankruptcy Court

Unparalleled Personalized Service

When you need a Mediator in Orlando or anywhere in Central Florida
Sid Roman can help you find a compromise


As a bilingual Attorney and Florida Supreme Court Certified Mediator Certified in Small Claims, County, Circuit, Foreclosure and Bankruptcy Courts, Sid Roman has been providing Alternative Dispute Resolution and Mediation Services of the highest caliber to Courts, the Orange County Bar Association, businesses and individuals throughout Central Florida for over 20 years.
 
Sid regularly volunteers as a Mediator for the County and Circuit courts of the Ninth Judicial Circuit (Orange and Osceola counties), where he has earned praise and recognition for his almost 20 years of volunteer service. 

A Veteran of the US Air Force, Sid is committed to excellence in everything he does. As a result, he has has earned the trust of many in the Central Florida community. Whatever your legal or mediation needs might be, you can count on Sid for results and unparalleled personal service. Call 407-251-1200 or book online today.

Mediation Areas Served

We offer mediation services in the following areas: 

  • Small Claims Court Mediation (up to $8,000)

  • County Court Mediation ($8,000 - $30, 000)

  • Circuit Court Mediation ($30,000+)

  • Foreclosure Court

  • Bankruptcy Court

Handshake_edited.jpg

What is Mediation?

Mediation is different from litigation (a trial), where a judge or jury makes a final decision. With mediation, both sides can “win”. Mediation is neither a trial nor an arbitration. In a trial, the parties present evidence and argument so a judge or jury decides the outcome of the dispute. Likewise, in arbitration, the parties present evidence and arguments and an arbitrator decides the outcome of the dispute. 

 

In contrast, in mediation the mediator assists the parties to help them find and explore mutually acceptable resolutions of their dispute. If an agreement can be reached in mediation, trial and/or arbitration can be avoided.

Why Mediate?

 

When you have a dispute with another party, a mediator can help talk through issues and concerns and try to help you come to an agreement on the path forward about the dispute.

 

The mediator acts as a neutral and impartial party to help facilitate solving your dispute; however, he or she does not provide legal advice. While the goal of mediation is to try to work something out, it s not always possible to come to an agreement. 

 

What Happens in a Mediation?

Introduction/Opening Statements

Mediation typically begins with an introduction by the mediator explaining the process and his/her role and opening statements by the parties. This is usually followed by an opportunity for you and the other party to describe your concerns. If your lawyer is with you at mediation, these opening remarks may be made by you, your lawyer, or both of you. 

 

Discussion

After these initial procedures, the mediator usually will meet with both parties together to discuss the issues and help work out your differences, and he/she may also meet with each party privately (a caucus). Caucus discussions are confidential, however the parties may waive confidentiality in the interest of resolving the dispute. If you are represented by a lawyer, you and your lawyer will decide how the two of you will interact during the mediation, however, the parties are allowed to speak to the mediator at any time. 

211AB29C-DF61-423A-BFBE-69739F43DFB7_1_201_a.jpeg
Resolution or Outcome

Eventually, the mediation will end in one of three ways:

  1. The parties reach an agreement as to some or all issues - all parties (and their lawyers if present) must sign the agreement

  2. The mediator declares an impasse (because you, the other party, or both are unwilling to continue discussing resolution)

  3. The mediator, with the parties’ consent, continues the mediation session by adjourning for the day

 

If the mediator declares an impasse as to some or all issues, then you and the other party will have to go back to court to have the judge or jury (if there is one) decide your case.

Mediate. Don't Litigate.   
 
 

Finding A Compromise Starts Here

Fees

Mediation sessions can be scheduled virtually via Zoom, in our offices, or in person at any location agreed to between the parties. We are conveniently located near the Orlando Airport with ample free parking. 

 

Out fees are as follows: ​​

  • $175 Per Party Per Hour 

  • Two hour minimum 

  • Payment in full is required before or on the day of the Mediation

  • Both parties must pay for the Mediation in order for it to take place 

  • 48 hour notice is required for cancellations, or a fee of two hours is assessed 

To reserve and pay for a Mediation, please click on the image on the right. To schedule your session, please contact us at 407-251-1200.